Rachel Carson Salt Pond: Coastal Gem

Lobster caught at Rachel Carson Salt Pond.

DeLorme: Map 7, C4
GPS:  43.879828, -69.483940

{About Rachel Carson}

Rachel Carson Salt Pond was named after a dedicated marine biologist and conservationist who studied marine life along Maine’s coast. In 1966 the State of Maine and Nature Conservancy established the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge to protect salt marshes and estuaries on the coast of Maine for migratory birds. While a majority of the 5,300 acres of protected lands span 50 miles from Kittery to Cape Elizabeth, there is another location in New Harbor that is not only scenic but fascinating to explore.

View of the salt pond looking towards shore from the rocks near the ocean.
View of the salt pond looking towards shore from the rocks near the ocean.
You never know what you'll find in the salt pond with each tide!
You never know what you’ll find in the salt pond with each tide!
Following the stream that leads to the ocean.
Following the stream that leads to the ocean.

{Visit Rachel Carson Salt Pond}

The salt pond is on Route 32 heading towards New Harbor. The coastal route is scenic and passes through several small seaside towns along the way. Parking is along the road with the salt pond visible from the road. Use caution because tidal rocks can be very slippery.

The salt pond is a popular attraction at low tide and is host to many marine creatures. Tiny shrimp, crabs, snails, seaweed, mussels, and even baby lobsters can be found in the salt pond. Kids always enjoy trying to catch all sorts of different sea creatures in the pond and it is easy to spend two or more hours there.

There is a small stream that flows to the ocean at low tide and the setting is beautiful. It isn’t uncommon to see a sailboat passing by during your visit.

The rock formations around the pond are also incredible. Large boulders and hidden caves are located closer to the ocean to the right of the pond (facing the ocean). They are fun to climb around and explore, and make for some great photos!

A "cave" near the salt pond.
A “cave” near the salt pond.
There are lots of great photo-ops around the shore near the salt pond.
There are lots of great photo-ops around the shore near the salt pond.
Here is a cool boulder that is suspended by other boulders.
Here is a cool boulder that is suspended by other boulders.
More cool rock formations.
More cool rock formations.

The road sign where you park to visit the salt pond.
The road sign where you park to visit the salt pond.

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Angela enjoys exploring the many beautiful and unique natural places in Maine and sharing her outdoor experiences with others.When not out exploring Maine woods, trails, mountains and waterways Angela can be found plotting and planning her next adventure or buying another backpack.(Because you can never have too many).

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